Reader Comments

qpkwjqnaVhPzqaTSQ

"Buddy" (2018-10-30)

 |  Post Reply

Cool site goodluck :) how long does 5mg cialis last in your system In a recent paper, my colleagues Menelaos Karanasos, Jihui Zhang and I provide new econometric evidence on the dynamics of political protest from 1870 to 2003 in Brazil (Campos et al. 2013). We construct a new data set on formal and informal political institutions in Brazil and study how these institutions relate to per capita economic growth. We construct eight new measures of ‘formal’ (i.e. government crises, legislative effectiveness, legislative selection, major constitutional changes, size of the cabinet, number of cabinet changes, purges, and changes in the executive) and seven new measures of ‘informal’ political institutions (anti-government demonstrations, political assassinations, general strikes, guerrilla warfare, coups, riots, and revolutions). These variables were chosen mainly because growth research often uses them and, as most originate from the Arthur Banks data set, economists recognise these variables, are familiar with their definitions, advantages and limitations. Two well-known limitations are that data start in 1919 and exclude all world war years. Based on archival research and the extensive historical literature (which includes, among many others, Abreu and Lago 2010, Bethell 2008, and Fausto 1986), we constructed new time series based on the definitions from Banks that fill in the periods 1870 to 1918 and 1939 to 1945 and also allows us to check the accuracy of the original (shorter) Banks series.

Add comment